Fort Pulaski – Cockspur Island, Georgia

We arrived safely in Hardeeville, South Carolina on Thursday (11/06) after a leisurely trip of 259 miles (to date, we have traveled a total of 1,605 miles). As I noted before, we discovered that we enjoy interstate travel more, so this time we took I-77 South to eventually connect to I-95 South until we got close to our campground.  The campground that we are staying at, Hardeeville RV Park, is a really nice large park that is located on Hwy 315.  It appears to be on a major roadway to go to Savannah, Georgia or Hilton Head, South Carolina as there is a lot of traffic on the road, so it’s the perfect location for those of us that want to do the touristy thing and see the sights.

On Friday we went to Fort Pulaski which is located on Cockspur Island in Savannah, Georgia and spent the majority of the day there. The National Park Service offers two tours of the fort, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, or one can explore it on their own; however, I highly recommend taking one of the tours, as there is so much to learn in doing so.

The actual defining events of Fort Pulaski occurred during the American Civil War and the fort has stood guard over the Savannah River for over 150 years. It is quite an impressive fort and one that shouldn’t be missed if you are in the Savannah area.  There are numerous original and reproduction artillery pieces on display, and on Saturdays, they demonstrate the operation of one of their medium-sized cannons.

 

Blindage - Confederate defenders of the fort built earthen traverses between the guns and over the magazine and dug ditches and pits in the parade ground to catch rolling cannon shot.  They also erected a heavy timber blindage (splinter-proof shelter) to cover the interior perimeter of the fort to protect against shell fragments.
Blindage – Confederate defenders of the fort built earthen traverses between the guns and over the magazine and dug ditches and pits in the parade ground to catch rolling cannon shot. They also erected a heavy timber blindage (splinter-proof shelter) to cover the interior perimeter of the fort to protect against shell fragments.
The Damaged Wall - the craters made by Union artillery projectiles pock the south and southeast walls.  Rifled cannon shot fired from Tybee Island penetrated the walls 20 to 25 inches.  Some of the 5,275 shots fired can still be seen in the walls.
The Damaged Wall – the craters made by Union artillery projectiles pock the south and southeast walls. Rifled cannon shot fired from Tybee Island penetrated the walls 20 to 25 inches. Some of the 5,275 shots fired can still be seen in the walls.
Cannons on top of Fort Pulaski.
Cannons on top of Fort Pulaski.
A view of the inside of the grounds from on top of Fort Pulaski
A view of the inside of the grounds from on top of Fort Pulaski

 

The Prison - During the winter of 1864, the northeast, southeast, and part of the south casemates were used as a military prison holding Confederate officers under miserable conditions.  After the war, several political prisoners were held here.
The Prison – During the winter of 1864, the northeast, southeast, and part of the south casemates were used as a military prison holding Confederate officers under miserable conditions. After the war, several political prisoners were held here.

 

This huge triangular piece of land, bordered on all sides by the moat, protected the rear or gorge wall of the fort.  During the Civil War, this areas was flat with a surrounding parapet and contained outbuildings and various storage sheds.  The large earthen mounds, built after the war, overlay four powder magazines and passageways to several gun emplacements.
The Demilune – This huge triangular piece of land, bordered on all sides by the moat, protected the rear or gorge wall of the fort. During the Civil War, this areas was flat with a surrounding parapet and contained outbuildings and various storage sheds. The large earthen mounds, built after the war, overlay four powder magazines and passageways to several gun emplacements.

 

 

 

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